Mitchell Acoustic Electric Guitars Review: See What Came In under the Radar

Mitchell Exotic Wood MX420 acoustic electric guitar
Mitchell Exotic Wood MX420

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Have you ever heard of Mitchell guitars? Don’t be ashamed if you haven’t. Mitchell is not yet one of the better-known brands like Martin or Gibson or Fender. Someday they might be if the Element and Exotic series acoustic electric guitars they currently offer are any indication of what’s to come.

Mitchell makes several lines of guitars. In this review, I’ll concentrate on just the acoustic electric models in the Element series and the Exotic series. That makes a total of 4 guitars.

If you’re in a hurry and just want to check the availability and pricing of these four at Amazon, you can click the links in the list below.

If you want to skip ahead to a certain section of this review, you can click a link in the box below. Otherwise, you can just keep scrolling and reading as usual.

Mitchell Element Series ME1CE and ME2CEC

The ME1CE and ME2CEC are the acoustic electric models in this series. Mitchell also makes two non-electric acoustic Element models – the ME1 and ME1ACE.

To compare most of the features of these two guitars, examine the pictures and the table below.

You can also check out the short, promotional videos just below. The first was produced by Musician’s Friend. The second comes directly from Mitchell.

The main differences in construction between the ME1CE and the ME2CEC are the spruce top on the former versus the cedar top on the latter and the woods used for the back and sides. Sapele, used in the ME1CE, is an African wood that is harder than mahogany. The ME2CEC uses Indian rosewood for its back, sides, and fingerboard.

Both models have high-ratio, die-cast, chrome tuners with Ebonite keys. They also both employ the Fishman INK3 pre-amp that includes a built-in tuner. Controls on this module include volume, bass, middle, and treble.

Fishman INK3
Fishman INK3

The TUSQ material mentioned in the table is manufactured by Graphtech Guitar Labs. You can read more about it in their FAQ here.

Mitchell ME1CE
Mitchell ME1CE

Mitchell ME2CEC
Mitchell ME2CEC
Model ME1CE ME2CEC
Top Solid select spruce Solid select cedar
Back & Sides Striped sapele Indian rosewood
Neck Mahogany Mahogany
Fingerboard Indian rosewood Indian rosewood
Bridge Rosewood Rosewood
Finish Open-pore satin Open-pore satin
Inlay Abalone dots Abalone dots
Rosette Sapele / Maple Sapele / Maple
Binding Flame Maple Flame Maple
Electronics Fishman INK3 / tuner Fishman INK3 / tuner
 Scale Length (in.) 25 1/2 25 1/2
 Saddle Nubone TUSQ, compensated Nubone TUSQ, compensated
 Neck Joint Dovetail Dovetail

Mitchell Exotic Series MX400 and MX420

Both the MX400 and MX420 have the “Grand Auditorium” cutaway body style. Neither model has a pickguard. If that’s an important feature for you, you’ll either have to investigate installing one yourself or move on to a different guitar.

The MX420 is available in Midnight Black or Antique Sunburst (pictured below) finish.

Mitchell MX400
Mitchell MX400

Mitchell MX420
Mitchell MX420
Model MX400 MX420
Top, Back, Sides Quilted Ash Burl, Bubinga, or Ovangkol Quilted Ash Burl
Neck Mahogany Mahogany
Finish Gloss Gloss
Inlay Pearl dots Pearl mini-dots
Rosette Modified O Abalone
Binding Black Multi-Ply ABS Black / White / Black Multi-Ply
Electronics Mitchell CE304T / tuner Mitchell CE304T / tuner
Frets 20 total; 14 open 20 total; 14 open
Scale Length (in.) 25 1/2 25 1/2
Nut Width (in.) 1.67 1.67
Bridgepins Black with white dot Black with white dot
Saddle Compensated Compensated
Upper Bout Width (in.) 11 1/4 11 1/4
Lower Bout Width (in.) 15 1/2 15 1/2
Maximum Depth (in.) 3 1/2 3 1/2
Neck Joint Dovetail Dovetail
Dimensions L x W x D (in.) 41 x 15 1/2 x 3 1/2 41 x 15 1/2 x 3 1/2
Weight (lbs.) 9.2 9.2

Conclusions about the Mitchell Acoustic Electric Guitars

Online reviews of all of these models of Mitchell acoustic electrics are overwhelmingly positive. Most people fairly rave about them, especially those who had never heard of the Mitchell brand before discovering it at a local music store.

Many appreciate the color and finish, besides the quality construction and materials and the great sound.

Some owners compare their Mitchell favorably with their Martin or other high-end guitars.

As of this writing, the Mitchell Element series guitars are a little harder to come by at Amazon, but that can change daily.

Check the availability and pricing of Mitchell acoustic electric guitars at Amazon now.


Seagull S6 Acoustic Electric Guitars Review: Canadian Quality at a Good Price

Seagull S6 Spruce Sunburst GT
Seagull S6 Spruce Sunburst GT

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You may not be very familiar with the Seagull brand of guitars. I wasn’t, but I wish I had known about them sooner. They sound amazing, especially for the price. The Seagull S6 line of acoustic electric guitars seems like it was among the first, if not the original, line produced by Robert Godin back in 1982.

Here is a brief account of the origins of this brand as told on the Seagull website.

“In 1982 Robert Godin produced the first Seagull guitars in the Village of LaPatrie, Quebec. The concept for the Seagull guitar was to take the essential components of the best hand-crafted guitars (such as solid tops and beautiful finishes) and build these features into guitars that could be priced within the reach of working musicians.”

If you’re in a hurry and just want to check the pricing and availability of some of the guitars in the Seagull S6 line, you can click the links in the list below.

Most of these acoustic electrics have Seagull’s own “Quantum IT” electronics inside. Sometimes you will see this shortened to “QIT” or just “QI”. I think some writers have subsequently mistaken the letter “I” for the Roman numeral one, so you may also see this called “Q1” from time to time.

In any case, know that when you do see any of those shortened versions, you are going to be looking at an acoustic electric guitar, not just a plain acoustic – of which Seagull also makes many similar models.

Seagull S6 Classic M-450T

Speaking of the S6 line in general, Seagull says…

“Winner of several awards, the S6 is perhaps the instrument that best represents the Seagull philosophy. The S6 Classic offers players the opportunity to experience the great feel and superb sound provided by a hand finished neck with a slimmer, more traditional nut width, select solid Cedar top and a Custom Polished Finish.”

The main feature that makes the Classic M-450T stand out from the others in this line is the M-450T mentioned in the model name. This refers to the B-Band electronics it uses. (This is the one model here that doesn’t have the Godin QIT mentioned above.)

Apparently these electronics are a bit less expensive than the QIT because the S6 Classic is the cheapest of these guitars according to Seagull’s MSRP.

The other differences from the S6 Original are a slightly narrower nut (1.72 inches) and shorter scale (24.84 inches). You can see these similarities and differences (for all the models in this review) in the table below.

Model Classic Original Slim Concert Sunburst
Top Solid cedar Solid cedar Solid cedar Solid cedar Solid spruce
Back Wild cherry Wild cherry Wild cherry Wild cherry Wild cherry
Neck Silver leaf maple Silver leaf maple Silver leaf maple Silver leaf maple Silver leaf maple
Finish Semi-gloss Semi-gloss Semi-gloss Semi-gloss Gloss
Body Depth (in.) 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.13 4.9
Body Length (in.) 19.8 19.8 19.8 19.38 19.8
Nut Width (in.) 1.72 1.8 1.72 1.8 1.72
Scale (in.) 24.84 25.5 25.5 25.5 24.84
Upper Bout (in.) 11.38 11.38 11.38 11.19 11.38
Waist (in.) 10.54 10.54 10.54 8.92 10.54
Lower Bout (in.) 15.87 15.87 15.87 14.93 15.87

Seagull S6 Original

Watch this video from Sweetwater to get a good idea of what the S6 Original sounds like.

Per the video above, you may also be able to get this guitar in a Blue Burst or a Trans Red Burst finish. However, these options are not listed on the Seagull site (as far as I can see) nor are they offered on the major musical instrument sites, so they may no longer be available new. I’m sure you can find them secondhand though, if you really want one of these colorful designs.

The S6 Original model does include the Godin Quantum IT electronics with a built-in tuner.

Seagull S6 Cedar Original Slim

There’s not much difference between the Original and the Original Slim, other than the narrower nut, which is 1.72 inches like the Classic.

Seagull hints that this is a guitar for “entry level” players (as are several others here), but I don’t see that as a restriction on its use. I’m sure many advanced players would find this guitar suitable as well.

Seagull S6 Classic
Seagull S6 Classic

Seagull S6 Original
Seagull S6 Original

Seagull S6 Original Slim
Seagull S6 Original Slim

Seagull S6 Original Concert Hall

Probably for similar reasons (see just above), Seagull considers the Concert Hall model to be entry level as well. That said, their description of the possible uses of this model aren’t really made with the beginner in mind.

“The Concert Hall body shape has a focused mid-range tone, making it an ideal choice for fingerstyle players, singer/songwriters & exceptional for recording.”

Not that a beginner couldn’t play fingerstyle, be a singer/songwriter, or doing any recording, but those aren’t the first things an entry level player is very likely to perform.

Seagull S6 CW Spruce Sunburst GT

The “GT” in this model name simply stands for “gloss top”, and that’s one of the distinguishing features of this guitar. In fact, as you look at the table above, it’s one of only items that make it different from the Classic. The other difference is the spruce top with the sunburst finish pattern versus the cedar top.

Seagull S6 Concert Hall
Seagull S6 Concert Hall

Seagull S6 Spruce Sunburst
Seagull S6 Spruce Sunburst

Conclusions about the Seagull S6 Line

Referring back to the table above again, you can see that there isn’t a whole lot of difference from one of these S6 acoustic electrics to the next. The main standout is the Spruce Sunburst with its glossy spruce top and sunburst pattern finish.

With so little to distinguish the others, it will be a matter of the little things that determines which of these you like the best. All of them are good quality guitars at very reasonable prices.

Check the pricing and availability of the Seagull S6 line of acoustic electric guitars at Amazon.


Fender Acoustic Electric Specialty Guitars Review: 4 Names You Need to Know

Fender Stratacoustic
Fender Stratacoustic

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Fender makes guitars. You knew that.

Fender makes very good guitars. You knew that too.

In this review, I’ll look at some Fender acoustic electric guitars that you could call specialty guitars, especially because they have special names. With apologies to Dana Carvey, now isn’t that special? Continue reading “Fender Acoustic Electric Specialty Guitars Review: 4 Names You Need to Know”

Yamaha Acoustic Electric Guitars Under $300 Reviews: Pick from Just a Few

Yamaha FSX800C guitar
Yamaha FSX800C guitar

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If you glance at the list (below) of Yamaha acoustic electric guitars that will be featured in this review, you would think at first that there are 6 models from which to choose. Technically, you would be correct, but there are really only 3 different styles there.

You can probably guess by looking at the first letter of each model why this is so. In this article then, I’ll group similar models together but still show you the differences among them. Continue reading “Yamaha Acoustic Electric Guitars Under $300 Reviews: Pick from Just a Few”

Ovation Acoustic Electric Guitars under $300: Not Many Choices, Sorta

Ovation Applause Balladeer
Ovation Applause Balladeer

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When I started looking for Ovation acoustic electric guitars under $300, I thought I had found a handful of models I could choose from. Unfortunately, it looks like some of them are no longer available (new). Of the several models I did find, they all boiled down to just two – the Applause Balladeer AB24II and the Applause Elite AE44II.

You can get more than one color of each Applause model, which is why it looked like there were more available originally. The Balladeer and the Elite don’t differ all that much from each other, so your options for an Ovation guitar under $300 aren’t all that great.

I’ll take a look at what you will be able to find and show you the differences among them in this review. Continue reading “Ovation Acoustic Electric Guitars under $300: Not Many Choices, Sorta”

Ibanez Acoustic Electric Guitars under $300 Review: Colorful Choices for Not a Lot of Cash

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Are you looking for a quality, inexpensive, acoustic electric guitar and want some variety in your color options? If so, you’ve come to the right place. The Ibanez acoustic electric guitars I’ll look at in this review should each be available for less than $300, and you will have 9 colors from which to choose.

I’ll look at 8 guitars here, which at first seems like a lot, but we can put 6 of them into two groups because they are very similar models. So in the end this will feel more like we’re comparing just 4 guitars instead of 8. Continue reading “Ibanez Acoustic Electric Guitars under $300 Review: Colorful Choices for Not a Lot of Cash”

5 Epiphone Acoustic Electric Guitars Under $300 Review: Nice Choices

Epiphone Hummingbird PRO
Epiphone Hummingbird PRO

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You may have heard that Epiphone (acoustic electric) guitars are less expensive versions of the pricey Gibsons. To a certain point, you could argue that that is true, but Epiphone guitars are really fine instruments in their own right. Cheaper than Gibsons, yes, but still of very high quality.

Even those Epiphones under $300 which I’ll examine here are among the best “beginner” acoustic electric guitars you can find today. There are at least 5 models that you should be able to get in this price range.

If you’re in a hurry and want to quickly check the pricing and availability of these five at Amazon, you can click the links in the list below. They are listed in no particular order. Continue reading “5 Epiphone Acoustic Electric Guitars Under $300 Review: Nice Choices”

Takamine Acoustic Electric Guitars under $500 Reviewed: Japanese 6-Stringed Delights

GD30CE
GD30CE

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Takamine has produced acoustic electric guitars in Japan since the 1960s. Their instruments are still highly regarded today. I’ll take a look at those models that you can normally get for under $500 in this review.

Takamine (pronounced, ta-ka-mee-nay) makes a wide range of guitars, but here we’ll concentrate on just their best acoustic electric guitars for less than $500. (I’ll cover some of the higher priced instruments in another article.)

If you are pressed for time and just want to check out the pricing and availability of the Takamine guitars in this review at Amazon, you can click the links in the list below. I know this list is longer than it should be for an article like this, but there are so many options in this price range that I just couldn’t decide which ones to leave out. Continue reading “Takamine Acoustic Electric Guitars under $500 Reviewed: Japanese 6-Stringed Delights”

Simmons Electronic Drum Sets: Can You Hear Me Now?

Simmons SD2000 Electronic Drum Set
Simmons SD2000 Electronic Drum Set

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Many drummers love the Simmons electronic drum sets because they realize you get what you pay for. However, many others are generally disappointed with what Simmons has been producing lately.

In this article, I’ll take a brief look at the various kits from Simmons. I’ll try to point out what it is that owners like and don’t like so you can judge for yourself whether a Simmons drum kit is for you or not. Continue reading “Simmons Electronic Drum Sets: Can You Hear Me Now?”

2Box DrumIt Five Electronic Drum Set Review: One Trick Pony?

2Box DrumIt Five electronic drum kit
2Box DrumIt Five

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2Box is the Swedish manufacturer of the DrumIt Five electronic drum set. They really only have the one product (as of this writing) available in the US. They have developed a universal sound module called the DrumIt Three, but that is currently only available in Europe.

The DrumIt Five was highly anticipated before it debuted several years ago. The kit seems to have lived up to the hype, as many users today rate it very highly. It’s just unfortunate that it took much longer than expected to arrive and that no other products are yet available.

That said, in this review we’ll take a look at what the DrumIt Five is all about so you can see if it’s a kit that matches your needs. Continue reading “2Box DrumIt Five Electronic Drum Set Review: One Trick Pony?”